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2 edition of Root texture - an important factor in survival and growth of outplanted black spruce found in the catalog.

Root texture - an important factor in survival and growth of outplanted black spruce

F. Richard Clarke

Root texture - an important factor in survival and growth of outplanted black spruce

by F. Richard Clarke

  • 280 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18062750M

Tree Root Damage to Buildings provides a comprehensive analysis of how the interaction of trees, soils and water can cause foundation movement and damage to properties Usually the second most expensive insured peril, after : $ The Pine family contains several genera. Pinus (Pine), Picea (Spruce), Abies (Fir), Tsuga (Hemlock), and Larix (Larch) are found in our area. Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir) and some others (including non-indigenous Pine) can be found in cultivation. I regularly use White Pine, which is partially due to it being more common in my area than the other Pines.

The symptoms of Armillaria are similar to those of other root disorders; height growth is reduced, foliage is sparse, and leaves that remain on plants are stunted and yellow. An abnormal flow of sap may be visible on the root collar. When soil is removed from the base of the trunk, black, root-like strands are visible and attached to larger roots. positively related to root mass in the first developmental stages, which could be a decisive factor on the survival of young plants (Larson et al. ). However, it is not known whether these relationships (seed mass vs. survival and seed mass vs. growth) persist when species are reintroduced byAuthor: Leonardo Gallo Macera, Silvia Rahe Pereira, Andréa Lúcia Teixeira de Souza.

Montoro Girona Miguel, Morin Hubert, Lussier Jean-Martin et Walsh Denis. (). Radial growth response of black spruce stands ten years after experimental shelterwoods and seed-tree cuttings in boreal forest. Forests, 7, (10), p. Cited by: Root dieback does add organic matter to the soil, which increases soil porosity, the infiltration rate of water, and the soil's moisture-holding capacity. If sufficient time has passed, enough leaves will regrow and the roots will regrow as well.


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Root texture - an important factor in survival and growth of outplanted black spruce by F. Richard Clarke Download PDF EPUB FB2

Root pruning plug -transplant or 2 + 0 bareroot white spruce planting stock even to what seems an extreme degree (10 cm below the root collar) has a very minor effect on field performance. The small, albeit statistically significant, reduction in first field season shoot growth due to root pruning is unlikely to be of practical significance.

Luoranen and Rikala Nutrient Loading of Norway Spruce Seedlings Hastens Bud Burst and Enhances Root Growth after Outplanting and % to % and % in. Growth and physiology of layers versus naturally established seedlings of boreal black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP) were compared 15 years after a cutover in Quebec.

duced root growth and stability, despite concluding that root strangulation is a myth and finding evi-dence that root deformation decreases over time. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of root form on the growth and survival of Douglas-fir.

Inflooding stress was repeated. Trees root systems were partially excavated inand root architecture was characterized. Deep planting did not affect trunk diameter growth over 8 years. Survival was % for the first 5 years; however, one 30 cm below grade tree died after flooding in and another died after the by: 5.

TRANSPLANTING METHOD INFLUENCES SURVIVAL AND GROWTH OF BARE-ROOT CONIFEROUS NURSERY STOCK by Glen P. Lumis and A. Gail Johnson Abstract. The survival and subsequent growth of conifers transplanted bare-root using several methods to reduce moisture loss were compared to that of conventional balled and burlapped (B&B) plants.

Forests in the montane-Mediterranean zone have only recently began to be affected by wildfires, therefore the knowledge necessary for restoration projects is missing.

The aim of the study was to assess the effects of factors related to seedling attributes, weather conditions and site suitability on seedling performance. The characterisation of sites was based on bedrock and soil clay.

Root and butt rot. Spruce trees with "needle yellowing" had significantly higher rates of root and butt rot (Fig. Of the investigated declining trees, 92% showed rot, mostly by Heterobasidion annosum, whereas less than 12% of the healthy-looking spruce trees were infected.

Nutrient content of the needles. There was a. J-rooting) was the primary factor affecting survival (fig. in fact, when compared to tlie survival of i-roots () placed in a very shallow hole (only 13 cm deep), J-roots () increased survival by 18 to 27 percent. Extrapolating the equations in figure 1 suggest that 90 percent survival could have been obtained if roots had beenFile Size: KB.

We have chosen black spruce because of its natural proven ability to survive and grow in wet areas in northwestern Alberta. This research project has been designed to accomplish the following two major objectives. To test the survivability and growth of winter-planting frozen black spruce container seedlings, relative to spring planting 2.

Growth, survival, and root system morphology of deeply planted Corylus colurna 7 years after transplanting and the effects of root collar excavation Susan D. Daya, J. Roger Harrisb mounds increased survival and growth of spruce in comparison with.

Hébert François, Boucher Jean-François, Walsh Denis, Tremblay Pascal, Côté Damien et Lord Daniel. Black spruce growth and survival in boreal open woodlands 10 years following mechanical site preparation and planting.

Forestry, 87, (2), p. Cited by: Growth, survival, and root system morphology of deeply planted Corylus colurna 7 years after transplanting and the effects of root collar excavation. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening 7: Article: M. Ismail and K. Noor M. Ismail and K. Noor. Home > Root growth > Root pruning trees > Root pruning guidelines.

Root pruning guidelines. Trenching and digging in the soil near trees can cut roots, and this can damage the tree resulting in tree decline or the tree falling over (See: fallen tree from cutting roots).This can cause liability and safety concerns.

The most common host is Colorado spruce but other types of spruce can also be attacked by this fungus. Close examination with a hand lens will reveal rows of black spots on infected needles. Seasonal patterns of radial root growth within 1 m of tree stems were examined in Scottish plantations of Sitka spruce trees aged 9, 15 and 20 years.

Results were compared with parallel measurements of shoot extension, radial growth of stems and amounts of starch stored in tissues external to root by: survival and initial growth of seedlings planted on boreal sites dominated by erica - ceous shrubs (e.g., Prévost and DumaisThiffault and Jobidon ).

In Junewe divided each main plot into two subplots of 25b×b25bm to which we assigned species for planting, black spruce or jack pine. Seedlings were from local seed. Tamarack and black spruce adventitious root patterns are similar in their ability to estimate organic layer depths in northern temperate forests.

Can. Soil Sci. Organic layer consumption during forest fires is hard to quantify. These data suggest that the adventitious root methods developed for. Generally, the seedling survival rates of these two types declined with time (Fig. 1, Table 2).For intermediate shade tolerant species, the survival rate at the 50% thinning intensity was significantly higher than the survival rates at 0% and % thinning intensities ().For shade intolerant species, the survival rate at the % thinning intensity was significantly lower than Cited by: 6.

A relationship between tree growth and age was also observed by Thorpe et al., who speculated that the age-dependent increase in pathogenic fungi (e.g.

root-rot fungi such as Armillaria spp. and Inonotus tomentosus (Fr.) Teng. for black spruce (Whitney, ) could be an important factor explaining the declining growth with by:. Field observations demonstrated inhibition of root growth by moder humus material of the Of2 and Oh-layers under beech and spruce.

Growth chamber experiments with spruce seedlings showed that root growth on a natural Of2-substrate is ten times lower than on resin-quartz mixtures. Added phenolic acid (protocatechic a.) inhibited root growth only in Cited by: Standiford ); subalpine fir, white spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss), and black spruce (Picea mariana [Mill.] B.S.P.) (Johnstone ).

Most of these studies compared growth prior to clearcutting to postharvest performance rather than investigating effects of overstory removal per se. The purpose of our study was to develop.

The American chestnut was once a mainstay in hardwood forests as far north as Maine and as far south as Georgia and Mississippi. A massive chestnut blight in the early part of the 20th century.